...the particular passage which is being referred to happens on the the end of 'stinkfoot', and takes place in the context of a man having a conversation with his dog.

the dog asks the man, what is his conceptual continuity.

so the dog is posing a philosophical question to the man about what the man thinks the nature of reality is, or at least his understanding of it.

the dog is basically asking, what is reality?

well, what is an apostrophe?

an apostrophe is a symbol. its an idea. and what is anything else for that matter? what am i to you, but an idea within your mind.

and so, the apostrophe, being a symbol of defined purpose but undefined potential, becomes a more accurate symbol to represent whatever we currently call 'reality'.

basically saying that the crux of the 'biscuit', i.e. reality itself, is more accurately represented by a symbol such as an 'apostrophe'.

meaning... words are limited, language is limited...

ideas and concepts are limitless...

the apostrophe is a symbol that represents something that is not clearly defined.

i mean, if you find an apostrophe inside of a word, you know that it means 'symbol for conjoining two words together' or 'symbol to represent plurality, or ownership'... and that makes well enough sense.

but say you have an apostrophe out on the page by itself... what does it mean then?

it is a vague symbol that can mean anything...and it does.

being able to move beyond that and see, that what binds reality together is something that goes beyond conventional comprehension.

just try to imagine what an apostrophe means by itself. ---->     '     <----

(an apostrophe, out of context)

basically, the apostrophe by itself goes beyond logic. it still means SOMETHING, but without context, it is impossible to define.

it is only within the CONTEXT of language can the purpose of the apostrophe be understood and decoded.

the way we observe things and learn about reality is by looking at context. our understanding of everything is based on the context in which it is being observed.

basically, an apostrophe is dependent upon context to be understood... but an apostrophe is not dependent upon context to EXIST.

and reality is the same way... reality is dependant upon context in order to be understood, but it is not dependent upon context in order to EXIST.

and so, in this way, the apostrophe is an accurate symbol for whatever we might call this existence...

...and so, the crux of the biscuit is the apostrophe.


Comments
  • Mark D.

    "Apostrophe" is the first Frank Zappa album I bought as a teenager in the 70's and the beginning of a lifelong listener to his art and prophetic verses.

     

    Stinkfoot was one of my favorites and I knew in an instant that I would someday use this great phrase "The crux of the biscuit is the apostrophe" so I had to have what I believed was the best explaination of its meaning. 

     

    I began breaking it down into components which I could define and this began with defining "Apostrophe." The context in which it was used in the song was the contraction of words as "It doesn't, and you can't, I won't, and it don't it hasn't, it isn't, it even ain't, and it shouldn't it couldn't" so I made the assumption that apostrophe was in place of something missing.

     

    Crux does have to do with matter, or the apex of the issue. So it can be said that the crux of the bisuit is what is missing. My understanding of the standard bisuit, is that they are not levened as most breads, this levening is what is missing and the issue of the biscuit.

     

    Did this make sense to a teenager? I am sure that many other interpretations can be made, but this one did make sense to me, and any time I used it it could be answered clear enough. I currently have is plastered across the back of my VW van and have only been asked once what it meant and my answer was this:

    "The issue is what is missing" Like this nation, we have no dialog, and this is the crux of that biscuit.

    But I cannot assume to be absolutely correct about the words of a genius as Frank Zappa, but like I have seen with my own art, those experiencing it may have a different opinion on its meaning, which is sometimes all right by me.

    Mark

  • Brad K.

    Very deep. Sadly, my interpretation had something to do with the pointy end of a well-pinched dog turd. I'll just chalk that up as a "swing-and-a-miss".

  • Thomas

     

    I have pondered this for many years but the answer is quite simple and also has other resonances as well...

    Just look at the emoticon(is this the first ever use of an emoticon?)

     

    (')

    And I mean: look at it. It's a certain part of the female anatomy, once the source of a Seinfeld joke "it rymes with the name of a female body part"...

     

    All the other meanings relate back to this one. And listen: it is indeed the crux of the biscuit. Arf, she said!

  • Thomas

    Hi,

    I have pondered this for many years but the answer is quite simple and also has other resonances as well...

    Just look at the emoticon(is this the first ever use of an emoticon?)

     

    (')

    And I mean: look at it. It's a certain part of the female anatomy, once the source of a Seinfeld joke "it rymes with the name of a female body part"...

     

    All the other meanings relate back to this one. And listen: it is indeed the crux of the biscuit. Arf, she said!

  • Space

    Perhaps, if that's the case, then Frank was refering not just to the apostrophe within the context of what was just discussed, but within the context of the album and his career? The album itself could be taken out of context and enjoyed just by itself, which is what appears to have been the case as many have cited it as their way into the zappa catalogue. Or it can be taken within the context of his entire career to date, as another chunk of conceptual continuity? 2000 words. Discuss. go. 

     

    Clearly though, its evidence of Frank spending far more brain power than any of us have considering a concept.